Monthly Archives: December 2009

Latkes (or Ejjeh Potato)

You didn’t think we’d get through eight days of Hanukkah and not post a holiday recipe for you, did you?

We actually eat ejjeh potato all the time, not only on Hanukkah. It’s a delicious and easy food to make for the beach on a summer Sunday afternoon. They also make great leftovers, so make extra and take some for lunch in a sandwich the next day.

Because latkes are fried, they are a customary Hanukkah food. On these eight days, Jews load up on oily foods to remember the miracle of the oil. These latkes are different than the Ashkenaz version, which you probably see more often. These are more like home fries. They’re soft in the middle and really deliciously crispy on the outside. Continue reading

Cooking Yebra

We taught you how to roll and freeze the yebra, and I’m sure you were eager to know how to actually cook at eat it…well here’s one way to do it!

Yebra is definitely a Syrian favorite. We eat it with sweet sauce, sour sauce, meat filled, and with rice and chick peas inside (a pareve version). Different families prefer it different ways. This is not how our mom makes it, but it’s a really yummy version with apricots, one of my favorites.

These take a long time to cook, so if you’re making it for Friday night dinner, make it on Thursday night and reheat it before dinner Friday.

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Knead Not Sourdough

sourdough

Alton made bread in his dutch oven. I had to make bread in my dutch oven, too! It’s actually a very easy bread to make, perfect for beginner bread makers. Why? There’s no kneading! You just have to wait a really really long time for it to rise. Like 19 hours, and then 15 minutes, and then another 2 to 3 hours. It was worth it in the end. It was really yummy. I love homemade bread.

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Guest Post: Bulgur (or Cracked Wheat) with Chickpeas

Please give a warm welcome to our very first guest blogger, our lovely sister-in-law Adele!

I LOVE CHICKPEAS. There. I said it.

I’m a sucker for anything with chickpeas in them – salads, hummus, curry – whatever it is, I’ll eat it. Chickpeas, or Garbanzo Beans, are super delicious, super filling, super healthy, and super cute! (Seriously – have you ever looked at one? It looks like a baby butt!) If you ever need a protein in your meal – a handful of chickpeas is generally the way I go. They are versatile like you wouldn’t believe and couldn’t be easier to store. (In the past, I’ve bought dried chickpeas, soaked them overnight, boiled them, yadda yadda yadda. The canned is way easier. Just make sure to rinse them off thoroughly first. Here’s what Mark Bittman has to say on the subject.)

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Rolling Yebra

Yebra, or stuffed grape leaves, is a traditional Syrian food that can be prepared in a few different ways. But before you can eat it, you have to actually stuff and roll the grape leaves with hashu (there’s a pareve version, too). To make a whole 16-oz. jar of grape leaves, you need to double the hashu recipe.

I actually used a slightly different recipe for hashu. This one is from a cookbook called Deal Delights, a pretty old book with traditional Syrian recipes.

IMG_3783 IMG_3782 grape leaves

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Breakfast Bars

I didn’t really know what to call this post. They can’t be called walnut and dried cherry bars, because those are the only two things I omitted from the recipe…I stuck with breakfast bars because I eat these for breakfast. Any suggestions for a more interesting name?

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When I saw Ellie Krieger’s recipe for walnut and dried cherry bars, I really wanted to make them. The only problem was that I didn’t have any dried cherries on hand, and I can’t bring nuts to work with me. I decided to give it a try, anyway, with raisins and dried cranberries instead.

They were so easy to make and very delicious. It took about 5 minutes to put the ingredients together and 30 minutes in the oven, and I have breakfast for a little over a week.

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Japanese Sweet Potato Chips

japanese sweet potato chips

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When I saw this at the fruit store, I just had to buy it. I didn’t know what I’d do with it, but it was really funny looking, and I had to have it. I picked the longest one in the basket and decided to figure something to make out of it when I got home. It’s a Japanese Sweet Potato. The outside is red, the inside is white. It has less moisture than the orange sweet potato that you’re used to, and I’m pretty sure that they’re not even related. Continue reading